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Results 1-12 of 12 for Barbara Hudson.
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Tick-Tock Goes Canonical’s Clock

"Bug #1 - Microsoft has a majority market share." - Ubuntu bug tracker. Much has changed since Canonical started on its quirky quest to "fix bug #1." Seven years ago Microsoft was seen as stagnant, ripe for plucking. Longhorn was still MIA, and Microsoft users were busy patching XP against the lat...

OPINION

Canonical’s Ticking Time Clock

"Bug #1 - Microsoft has a majority market share." - Ubuntu bug tracker. Much has changed since Canonical started on its quirky quest to "fix bug #1." Seven years ago Microsoft was seen as stagnant, ripe for plucking. Longhorn was still MIA, and Microsoft users were busy patching XP against the lat...

OPINION

What Open Source Can Learn From Steve Jobs, Part 2

The blind hatred of Free Software Foundation President Richard Stallman toward proprietary programs is such that he has given speeches in which he advocated for software piracy. Stallman wrote this the day after Steve Jobs died: "As Chicago Mayor Harold Washington said of the corrupt former Mayor D...

OPINION

What Open Source Can Learn From Steve Jobs, Part 1

The passing of Steve Jobs earlier this month triggered reactions that spanned the gamut -- from expressions of appreciation and sober reflection to some tasteless extremes of zealotry from a subset of the open source community. We can learn a lot from Steve Jobs, even if we ultimately have different...

OPINION

How NOT to Push a New Open Source License, Part 2

Maybe it's time for yet another open source license. Consider this: The Respect The Programmer License (RPL) Version 0.3. The RPL addresses one problem prevalent in most licenses, including the BSD, MIT, and GPL -- it's easier to just edit the file in front of you to fix a bug or add a feature than ...

OPINION

How NOT to Push a New Open Source License, Part 1

Bruce Perens recently introduced what he calls a "Covenant" open source license on behalf of Lexis-Nexis, owned by Reed Elsevier, aka "the scientific journal paywall people," for one of Lexis-Nexis' internal projects. It didn't take long for readers on both slashdot and lwn to rip it apart. Of parti...

OPINION

How NOT to Push a New Open Source License, Part 1

Bruce Perens recently introduced what he calls a "Covenant" open source license on behalf of Lexis-Nexis, owned by Reed Elsevier, aka "the scientific journal paywall people," for one of Lexis-Nexis' internal projects. It didn't take long for readers on both slashdot and lwn to rip it apart. Of parti...

OPINION

FSF’s Star Turn in the Android FUDathon, Part 4

"Strike while the iron is hot" -- and the usual suspects have made Android licensing a hot issue. However, the title of the FSF article, "Android GPLv2 termination worries -- one more reason to upgrade to GPLv3," gives the game away. This is about politics, not licensing. About pushing a specific ...

OPINION

FSF’s Star Turn in the Android FUDathon, Part 3

Where did this "you are permanently barred from distributing" stuff originate? In digging around, I found a post titled "A Practical Guide to GPL Compliance" at the Software Freedom Law Center dated August 26, 2008, written by the team of Bradley M. Kuhn, Aaron Williamson and Karen M. Sandler. It st...

OPINION

FSF’s Star Turn in the Android FUDathon, Part 2

Mr. Smith was kind enough to reply two days later: "Hi Barbara, Thanks for your feedback. I've responded to some your specific points below. I'm aware that a license change in Linux would require significant effort. However, that doesn't mean it can't or shouldn't be done. I wish it was easier for...

OPINION

FSF’s Star Turn in the Android FUDathon, Part 1

My first thought was that someone was engaging in click-bait journalism. Even the title of the post -- "Android GPLv2 termination worries - one more reason to upgrade to GPLv3" -- is something I would expect from anti-Android trolls, not the Free Software Foundation. The conclusion at the bottom of ...

OPINION

The Death of the Smartphone

Smartphones and tablets might be the current hot technology, but history says it's all just another fad. Twenty years from now, almost nobody will own either device. Seems unbelievable, but the same technology that makes them hot today will make them not tomorrow. Consider what happened to another "...

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